LRA Study Group: Approaches to Video Data Analysis in Literacy Research


Welcome to the online community space for our study group, Approaches to Video Data Analysis in Literacy Research. Our study group began meeting formally at the 2009 Annual Conference and the sessions were well attended by over 30 people in person and virtually through our Ning. Since then, we have grown to over 50 members. This space is designed to build on the positive energy with more opportunities for researchers to consider a powerful, shared research agenda that could contribute significantly to our knowledge base in the reading community.

As a group, our purpose is to better understand the cognitive and social complexities of literacy and learning through video analysis. Our study group is designed to welcome individuals who are just beginning to explore how video data might enrich their own areas of research as well as those who have collected video data and are hoping to generate innovative ideas for organizing, analyzing, and sharing their data with others. Our general interests, at this point, have clustered into four areas, including: (1) a theoretical rationale for using video analysis tools and techniques; (2) equipment and procedures for collecting video data; (3) methods for analyzing video data; and (4) ideas for presenting and/or teaching with video data. Many of us have a particular interest in how to capture the complex process of constructing meaning as readers interact, transact, and internalize information they read on the Internet for a range of purposes.

SCHEDULE FOR LRA 2014: This year’s sessions will focus on two theoretical frameworks that can inform video analysis and how to actually engage in the coding of video data from these diverse lenses. Day 1 is devoted to developing a common language associated with activity theory and multimodal theory and reflecting on how these theories can inform the research questions and coding practices in our own work. On Days 2 and 3, researchers with experience in applying these theories will offer short overviews of how theory informs their work and specific coding schemes they have used, followed by guided opportunities to apply these codes to snippets of the researcher’s data. Time at the end of each session will be reserved for study group members to grapple with concerns and reflect on how these analytical frameworks might inform analysis of their own video or digital data. The schedule is as follows:
  • Wednesday 12/3: Considering Applications of Activity Theory and Multimodality to Video Data
  • Thursday 12/4: Applying Theories of Multimodality to Digital Texts with Blaine Smith from the University of Miami


We look forward to the conversations and hope that you’ll join us at LRA 2014!
Julie Coiro, Jill Castek, and Lizabeth Guzniczak
Co-Chairs, Approaches to Video Analysis Study Group

SCHEDULE FOR LRA 2013: This year’s sessions will focus on three theoretical frameworks that can inform video analysis and how to actually engage in the coding of video data from these diverse lenses. Short overviews of each researcher’s theoretical framework and coding schemes will be provided at the beginning of each session, followed by guided opportunities to apply these codes to snippets of the researcher’s video data. Time at the end of each session will be reserved for study group members to grapple with concerns and reflect on how these analytical frameworks might inform analysis of their own video data.

The schedule (and readings for each day) is as follows:
  • Wednesday: Applying Activity Theory to Video Analysis, with Déana Scipio and Annie Kuo from the University of Washington
    • Reading: Roth, W-M., & Lee, Y-J. (2007). "Vygotsky's neglected legacy": Cultural-historical activity theory. Review of Educational Research, 77(2), 186-232.
    • Handouts:
  • Thursday: Applying Theories of Multimodality to Video Analysis, with Amy Stornaiuolo from the University of Pennsylvania
    • Reading: Gilje, O. (2010). Multimodal redesign in filmmaking practices: An inquiry of young filmmakers' deployment of semiotic tools in their filmmaking practice. Written Communication, 27(4), 494-522.
  • Friday: Analyzing Video Data Within a Social-Constructivist Framework, with Dana Robertson from the University of Wyoming
    • Reading: Wenger, E. (2009). A social theory of learning. In K. Illeris (Ed.), Contemporary theories of learning: Learning theorists in their own words. New York: Routledge.
  • Saturday: Exploring Partnerships and Future Collaborations

Please feel free to download the readings ahead of time to get a sense of each theoretical framework. Then join us each day for a short review of that day's theoretical focus before we dig into coding practice and discussion. We look forward to the conversations and hope that you’ll join us at LRA 2013!

Julie Coiro, Jill Castek, and Lizabeth Guzniczak
Co-Chairs, Approaches to Video Analysis Study Group